A Cop’s Nightmare 2: Vampires in the Old West

"A Cop's Nightmare 2: Vampires In The Old West" pits Morgan Blackwell and his best friend, Chuck Bendetti, against a conspiracy to recreate the state of Colorado as a "pure" vampire region. Traveling back to the 1860s, Morgan and Chuck find themselves pitted against a full team of vamp-clones, sent back to further the success of the conspiracy. As Morgan and Chuck battle vamp-clones and Indians in the old west, Karl and Don keep the modern-day vampire mayoral candidate from successfully completing the plan of a pure vampire colony started one hundred and thirty years before!

For further information about the "A Cop's Nightmare" series, click here.

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Comments others have made after reading this book:

-"I found the book a fun and engaging read. It has a little bit of something for everyone – horror, history, western, sci-fi, action/adventure, humor, political intrigue, and yes, even a little romance. Frank managed the tricky task of not introducing flawed logic into a story that deals with time travel – i.e. what happens to current history if you go back in time and change things. I consumed the entire book during the flight - it was that good!"

Here is an excerpt from this second book in the series:

"Good luck," Mike said as he took a few steps back away from us. "Give us a few minutes to clear the area and then do what you gotta do," he said. "Remember everything we've talked about while you're there," were his last words before he turned and walked away. Sheighan went with him, saying nothing and giving a short wave before he turned away as well.

Looking over at Chuck, I said, "You ready to do this?"

"No," he answered me honestly. "I've got so much adrenaline flowing through me right now that I think I'm actually vibrating," he chuckled, though I could sense it wasn't authentic. "But let's get it over with before we bullshit too long and never do it."

"Hold on," I said, meaning it both figuratively and literally. Chuck reached over and grabbed my arm, and we were sitting close enough that he could hold onto me without having to reach far. For a moment I remembered the scuba training he and I had taken together. We were dive-buddies and one rule we always paid attention to was, "never be more than an arm's reach from your buddy." I smiled at the memory of the first time that rule paid off and then took a deep breath. As I slowly released the breath, I activated the step-tech device. At first I didn't think anything was changing around us, but the air felt thicker and the sounds were crisper…. Until they became an elongated squeal carrying every pitch, with no individual sound being distinguishable from another.

As the squeal softened to silence, I realized that the trees were changing around us. The leaves were changing colors, coming and going, and the trees were getting shorter. As the minutes passed for us, years passed faster around us and the landscape changed as we watched. The air stayed thick as if it was an extremely humid summer day, but breathing seemed easier, though I couldn't figure out why. I was almost startled when the darkness set in and I felt like I was in an isolation chamber. With the exception of Chuck's hand on my arm and the rock under my butt, I had no sense of existence at all. There was no sound except for my own heartbeat, which I could seem to hear with my entire body, and my breathing, which sounded like wind rushing in my ears. I couldn't see or hear Chuck beside me, but his hand on my arm was the anchor in this empty space that I held onto. I focused my being on the contact between his hand and my arm and wondered if he could feel my heart beating as well as I could? Was my arm pulsing under his hand? My arm felt like it was inflating and deflating with every beat of my heart and it felt like it was moving more and larger with every beat. Pretty soon, as strong as Chuck was, I knew that his hand wouldn't be big enough to stay wrapped around my arm and he'd be forced to let go. Then I'd be alone in this void…. No light… no sound…. Just the rock under my butt forever.

And then it began to lighten though there were still no sounds. The landscape was light gray at first, devoid of any color or movement. Then the color began to fill in and the movement became more perceptible. When the squeal of sound began I knew that we were getting near the end of our step-travel. Chuck's hand was still on my arm and my breathing wasn't quite so loud in my ears anymore. My heart was still hammering in my chest, and, like Chuck, I was sure that my entire body must be vibrating from the amount of adrenaline that was rushing through me.

It took us a moment to realize that we'd completed our trip. We sat for what seemed like several minutes with the birds chirping around us and some frogs croaking in the distance. I could hear the wind in the trees now, though they were different trees than they were when we started. I looked over at Chuck and asked, "Are were there yet, Dad?" He laughed, and I laughed, and we were both thankful for some levity in the moment. I was scared for him to release my arm. What if we were still stepping, but so slow that we could hardly perceive it? If he let go, we'd be out of synch and that would be a bad thing.

After things had returned to normal, we sat, his hand on my arm, for another five or ten minutes before we finally agreed that we had to be time-stable. He let go of my arm and nothing happened. Shrugging off my pack, I put the step-tech device back into it and then I began to climb down off the rock. Chuck handed the packs down to me and then climbed/jumped down himself. Getting back into our packs, we made sure our gunbelts were adjusted properly and began our walk to the nearest town. We knew that it would take us two days of walking, and maybe part of a third day depending on how hard we pushed ourselves. If everything had worked right, we were in eighteen-sixty-four, sometime near the end of the summer, beginning of fall. Any time in September or early October would be fine, but we wouldn't know when we were for sure until we got to the town.