Tag Archives: borelli

Life Is THE Final Exam

Do you remember… that kid in school that always wanted to sit next to you so he could copy your paper? Or your answers on a test? Were you that kid? Do you remember the guy you worked with who seemed to always copy your moves or changes or growth… whatever he saw you doing that he thought might benefit him if he did it too? Do you remember the neighbor you had that seemed to buy a new car every time you did? Or he only mowed his lawn the afternoon of the day you did yours in the morning? We all remember one or more of those folks. They are those who watch how we live life and, seeing how well we’re doing, they follow along, copying our moves, tracking our changes and thinking that if they just do the same, then they can do as well. Little do they realize: Not only are we not living the same life, but we’re not even in the same reality – because reality is as individual as we are. Let me explain that. Continue reading

Do You Artificially Shackle Yourself?

As I think a great many people do nearly every day now, I was surfing through some social media posts and I came across this image. Courtesy of @addicted2success, the image shows Superman in handcuffs and accompanied by four soldiers in body armor, etc. It’s an image from the movie “Man of Steel.”  The phrase on it is what caught my attention: How it feels when you’re stuck in your day job and you know your true potential. Continue reading

Don’t Let Your Past Shackle You

In the contemporary world there seem to be a host of beliefs, accepted as unavoidable fact, based on assumptions about the inevitable results of past events. The examples I would give are 1) Every combat veteran will have or does have PTSD and 2) If you have a family history of clinical depression then it’s inevitable that you have or will have it too.  Such beliefs… assumptions really… are not only far from accurate but, if believed, can be unnecessarily and avoidably debilitating. Let me explain. Continue reading

Expansive Outlooks

One really spectacular benefit of social media is that it allows you to follow those you choose, ignore those you want to and share news or commentary on your day as you see fit. There are a great many people who use it purely for trivia or entertainment. There are many companies that use it to pimp their product. There are also a host of people who use it to regularly share good news, positive messages and (hopefully) inspirational commentary. Finding THOSE people wasn’t as easy thirty or forty years ago and, in that way, social media can benefit everyone on a daily basis. That said, the benefit only exists if YOU seek out and follow the folks who share such positive messages. Here are a few other thoughts to go along with what you might find if you do. Continue reading

12 Secrets of a Happier Life

Every now and then in everyone’s life we get distracted by things that we either cannot change or that shouldn’t matter to us to begin with. The distraction can cost us time, emotional energy, mental fatigue and more. To increase the quality of our life and the sense of serenity in our days, it’s worth reviewing the simplest of lessons so we can keep our mental and emotional outlook fresh. Continue reading

Measuring Life

This is something we all know, but some of us need a reminder about every now and then. You don’t measure your life by how long it is (although that’s no reason to desire less than a long life); you measure it by how much you’ve lived in the time span you’re given. Since none of us knows exactly how much we’re given, it behooves us to live as much as possible, as energetically as possible, with the proper focus on what’s of actual value in our lives… EVERY DAY. Continue reading

Fad Diets & Long Term Fitness

It would be funny, if it weren’t in some ways sad, how many friends I have who are pursuing weight loss and better fitness. Perhaps, the older you get, the more you value your health and fitness. Certainly there’s a perception that being healthier and more physically fit will stave off our arch enemy – death. For all that, being “healthier and more physically fit” seems to somehow morph into “lose weight” all too often. Maybe it’s because general practitioners, cardiologists and every other doctor in the world seem to say, “You need to lose weight,” as if it’s a miracle cure. For sure, it can have a positive impact on your quality of life, but it’s not the end all be all of fitness. Yet the diet industry thrives. Continue reading

Sympathy vs. Empathy

Just the other day I was involved in a very brief virtual discussion about the benefits of empathy over sympathy. For the person to whom you’re expressing either of these, there is a benefit; but which is better or more beneficial for them? The person who originally posted it had the position that empathy was ultimately better than sympathy because you were seeing the suffering person’s outlook from their own perspective. I maintained that you can’t do that because you don’t have their same background, experience, knowledge, etc. Then, like I usually do, I overthought heck out of it and ended up simply making sure I understand the differences, strengths and any potential weaknesses. Then, as usual, I started typing. Continue reading

Is Belief in Karma a Religion?

Nearly every day of my life I hear someone say, “Karma’s a bitch,” or, “Watch what you do; you don’t want Karma visiting it back on you.” Both of these statements indicate a belief in a higher power, even though most of us don’t think of it that way. We tend to talk about karma as if it’s some universal power that builds up and dishes out negative energy based on what we feed into it. The part that is much less discussed or heard about is GOOD karma, but if you take into consideration the possibility of both good and bad karma, and the rewards or punishments visited back upon you based on your actions, you’re really talking about a religious faith… at least of sorts. Continue reading

Recognizing Faith Without Argument

Yesterday evening, in a local cigar shop, there was a conversation held about belief in God. I use the capital “G” there for God, because the conversation started out about whether or not one man’s son believed in God. It quickly morphed into a discussion about the difference between “belief in God,” and “belief in deity.” Like most conversations it eventually morphed into something else (mostly because a lot of people are uncomfortable discussing religion) but it was on my mind as I drove home. As I drove I realized how much I take on faith each day, and how much of that isn’t related to any religion at all. And the realization I’ve had before was reinforced again: “having faith” and “believing in a deity” is such a vast spread of shades of gray that I fail to comprehend how anyone can say they have NO faith. Continue reading