Tag Archives: decision

Making and Breaking Habits

According to brainpickings.org, it takes 21 days, at a minimum, to build a new habit. That’s 21 days of repeating the same action, at approximately the same time, and for something simple… like drinking a glass of water when you wake up each day. Another website suggests that it takes over two months – 66 days to be precise – before taking a certain action becomes “automatic”… in other words, a habit. Most other sites reporting on length of time for something to become a habit fall into that variation somewhere: between three weeks (at a BARE minimum for simple actions) to two months for more complex habits; or more difficult ones. Continue reading

The 12 Best Life Hacks

In today’s computer age, days where you can’t look around without seeing someone on their “smart” phone, and times of everyone being connected nearly full time, the word “hack” has come to take on a whole new meaning.  It is essentially used to mean “something that makes your life easier or an easier and faster way of doing something.” I’ve seen some pretty cool hacks posted online but I often wonder how come nobody ever shares TRUE “life hacks:” hacks that actually make your life easier in the way(s) that count most.  So… I had to.  I considered it a challenge I couldn’t back away from. Continue reading

The Butterfly Affect in Life

Plenty has been written about “the butterfly effect.”  Whole movies have been made about it from dramas about how minor changes we make can change the future, to science fiction movies where someone consciously tries to manipulate the present or future by changing something seemingly minor in the past. This entry is neither drama nor fiction, but simply… encouragement. All of us have the ability to change our future and, thanks to that butterfly effect, the smallest of changes today can have the largest of impacts tomorrow. Continue reading

Brightest Lights During The Darkest Times

NOTE: This blog isn’t being written, or even approached, with journalistic structure or professionalism in mind. The topic is suicide: awareness and (hopefully) avoidance or reduction. The statistics and data listed are gleaned from various sources and listed at the end. The rest of this is the result of input and comment from family, friends and coworkers along with a huge subjective filter that runs from my brain to my fingers – with a detour through my heart. It’s my hope – throughout the process of researching, gathering comments, collating and writing all of this – that it has some positive impact on the readers. I hate to think it, but some of the readers may be in a dark place and contemplating suicide to resolve their problem(s). Other readers may know someone who is thinking about committing suicide (statistically speaking, that’s almost guaranteed).  HOPEFULLY, some of this… any part of it, will help.  Last item: Some of this, because so much of it is just my articulated outlook, might aggravate you, anger you or insult you. None of that is my intent and I beg you to continue reading past anything that you don’t like to see if I suitably explain myself. Continue reading

A Fork in the Road

Fork: an instrument having two or more prongs or tines, for holding, lifting, etc., as an implement for handling food of any of various agricultural tools. The point or part at which a thing, as a river or a road, divides into branches.

All of us have heard, and used, the term, “a fork in the road.”  We use it to give directions. At the fork in the road, stay to your right. The common usage of this term quite often leads to the impression that a fork in the road has only TWO choices: left fork or right fork. But that’s not the case and when we think about the path of our lives, it is imperative that we not limit our thinking in such a way. Continue reading

A Letter To Me?

Country music star Brad Paisley wrote a song called, “A Letter To Me,” and the basic idea of the song was… if he could write a letter to himself; write it now but somehow send it back to his teenage self, what would he say? In the song he takes the opportunity to give his younger self a few valuable tidbits of advice.  Don’t argue with dad. Fill the tank before one particular date. Wait, never mind. That date turned out “pretty cool.” The lyrics, when I heard them today, made me wonder, what would I put in a letter to my younger self? Continue reading

Staying Positive & Why

Just recently on Facebook I saw a meme that was a joke. In essence it said, “Shoot for the stars because even if you only make it to the moon… you’ll still be thousands of miles away from me with your motivational BS.”  I had to laugh and share it with my friends. I wondered how many people had that outlook about the motivational stuff I try to generate and share?  I KNOW I have at least one friend who stopped following me on Facebook because, and I quote him, “You’re motivational crap every morning just turned my stomach.”  To each his own.  Some people are just determined to be negative, or aren’t happy unless they have something to complain about. Continue reading

Sometimes No Decision is “No”

Have you ever asked someone a question and had them answer, “I don’t know,”?  Of course you have, and sometimes that the correct answer.  If you ask them a question regarding a piece of knowledge or information that they don’t possess, then the correct answer for them to give you is, “I don’t know.”  However, if the question is about a piece of personal information such as a preference in where to eat dinner and they answer, “I don’t know,” then it can get a bit frustrating.  What I’ve found to be even worse is when I get no answer at all. Continue reading

The Past’s Impact On Your Future

Have you ever had one of those conversations wherein someone tells you that you shouldn’t have done something?  I used to have such conversations all the time with my dad.  He was the absolute best at reminding me of all the bad decisions I’d made.  He liked to tell me how different my life would be if I’d just made that OTHER choice.  What neither of us ever realized at the time was that the decisions were cumulative.  Each decision made is like a fork in the road: if you choose to take the path on the right, then you get more decisions / forks down that path. If you take the left then the same thing happens.  What most of us imagine is a future where the paths never intersect and actually the end points get farther and farther apart.  But what if the cumulative effect is a juncture of the paths? Continue reading

Who Is To Blame? YOU – And It’s Great!

I know a woman who, at the grand old age of about eight years old, was taught that someone else was to blame.  Blame for what?  Everything. That summer she lived with some relatives and in a very short time span she gained a lot of weight. She had lived the lifestyle of those particular relatives: she ate anything she wanted, did next to no physical activity, watched a LOT of television and gained weight.  She gained about ten pounds in two weeks.  For an eight year old sized person, that’s a lot of weight. When she got home to her family complaining about how fat she was, her mother insisted it wasn’t her fault; it was the fault of the relatives who let her do that. Continue reading