Tag Archives: goals

Do You Artificially Shackle Yourself?

As I think a great many people do nearly every day now, I was surfing through some social media posts and I came across this image. Courtesy of @addicted2success, the image shows Superman in handcuffs and accompanied by four soldiers in body armor, etc. It’s an image from the movie “Man of Steel.”  The phrase on it is what caught my attention: How it feels when you’re stuck in your day job and you know your true potential. Continue reading

Discussions, Arguments & Education

I am far from the first person to have talked about the difference between discussion and argument or the pros and cons of each. Just recently, though, I was involved in a conversation about this very topic in a place where discussion was more common than argument. Further, it was observed that the discussion in this particular type of establishment tended to be more enlightening than that of some others. As it happens, I was in a cigar bar involved in a discussion with several other military service veterans. Let’s talk first about the difference between arguments and discussions and then we can talk about the difference between the establishments cited and purposes served by the discussions. Continue reading

Motivation and…?

…Age

Just recently, as many readers know, I’ve renewed my focus on my health. I am not participating in any type of fad diet, nor using any diet “program.”  I’m not paying into CrossFit, Isometrix, Tone-ex, yada yada.  I’m using that ancient and under-appreciated method that has been proven over millennia: I’m eating cleaner and exercising more.

The challenge I sometimes find is my motivation waning. As I considered that this morning, I realized that my maintaining motivation seems more difficult now than it did when I was… say… 19. Of course, there’s a major difference: I don’t have a Drill Sergeant yelling at me now. Continue reading

2018 New Year Resolutions

Near the end of every calendar year… or in the first few days of a new year… huge numbers of people make resolutions with the goal of improving their life. Some of those resolutions are very specific and equally unrealistic.  For example, after someone has been a cigarette smoker for years (if not decades), they decide that starting January 1st of the New Year, they’re going to quit smoking… cold turkey.  Now, they’ve decided to quit a dozen times before and they’ve stopped smoking for several days at a time, made themselves miserable, and then come up with a reason why they just HAVE to have a cigarette. My own father stopped smoking for a year after he had heart surgery and then someone offered him a cigarette at a bar and he thought, “One won’t hurt.”  Another year later he had to go through the misery of quitting again. Continue reading

Life’s Simplest Lessons

Recently I saw an image through the wizardry of social media and, after having read through it, thought about just how true it was. The title was “Simple Formula for Living,” but that didn’t really describe the list of items included. As I read them, I felt they more described lessons to be followed for a prosperous and spiritually valuable life. I certainly don’t always follow each bit of guidance (because I’m human and therefore imperfect), but I see the value in each and strive to maintain my compliance to them. Let’s go through them and briefly discuss the value. Continue reading

Defining You

As happens all too often in my household, my son asked me a question that forced me to carefully think through my beliefs and values before offering an answer. I have to think carefully because I know, for sure and certain, he’s already trying to form that next question so if I’m not as specific and exacting as I can be, I give him huge maneuvering room to ask the more difficult questions. This week’s question really wasn’t so hard: “Dad, what makes an American an American?” The first and most obvious answer was, “Where he was born,” but that’s not what he was asking. He was looking for me to explain to him what values I felt that he, when he became an adult American, should have as part of his character. Long time readers know that such a conversation can’t be had without me sharing it, so here we go with an explanation of my answer. Continue reading

Who Do You Compete With?

As young children most of us are taught to play games and every game, no matter how simple, has a winner.  Obviously, if there is A winner then there is also a loser, or an assortment of them.  We’re also taught things like, “Don’t be a sore loser,” and “Don’t be a gloating winner.”  There is an effort made to teach us how to act whether things go our way or not; whether we win or lose.  We’re taught to play our hardest and do our best.  We’re taught, “It’s not whether you win or lose but how you play the game.”  What is all too often neglected in the teachings that center around games, competition, winning and losing is how all those neat clichés interconnect.  What do they really mean?  In the end, what do we gain by winning? What have we lost by losing? Continue reading

Ignore The Distractions

If you look back at the first two posts in the motivational category (where you’re reading this too), you’ll see the first two: Just Don’t Quit and You Don’t Have To Like It (You just have to do it).  This one?  Ignore the distractions; focus on the goal! One of the most respected military units in the WORLD today is the Navy SEALs.  They are considered the elite of the elite.  They are smart, fit, imaginative and simply don’t know how to quit.  Do you know what one of their secrets is?  Ignoring distractions.  What distractions you ask?  Things like fatigue, hunger, pain, home sickness, etc.  One of the reasons they are so successful in their missions is because they stay focused on the mission until it’s complete. Continue reading

Just Don’t Quit

For ten years now the show NCIS has been a fairly popular show.  Leroy Jethro Gibbs or more simply “Gibbs” has been quoting rules and teaching them to his team all that time.  Some I agree with; some I don’t, but “Gibbs’ Rules” finally inspired me to write out some of my own.  Rule number 1: Just don’t quit. Continue reading