Tag Archives: good

Living Life to Excess

This entry is about living your life in excess but bear with me for a few moments as I share a story with you from my recent past. I was working at The Tiki Tobacco Barn – a name that may not make sense except that it was a cigar shop located on the property of a Tiki Bar. It was an average day when an older guy (about 65ish and we’ll call him Bob) came in with a younger couple (guessing late 20s). While the young couple went into the humidor to pick out cigars, Bob decided to engage me in conversation. I had the shop television on and the series NCIS was on. This was during football season. Continue reading

Be Thankful for the Darkness

There’s an old joke about how some people are so stupid they would bang on their hand with a hammer just so they could enjoy how good it feels to stop. While none of us can imagine why anyone would voluntarily hurt themselves just so they could enjoy it when they stop, the “joke” does illustrate the process of experiencing a negative event and then having a deeper appreciation for the positive event that immediately follows. That’s the topic of this entry: the necessity of experiencing some “bad” things so that you can more deeply appreciate the “good” things… and how eventually you can learn to appreciate the “bad” things… and then they’re not so bad anymore. Continue reading

Don’t Tame Your Inner Monster: Harness It!

Have you ever had a thought and then wondered why it was so dark? Have you ever looked in the mirror and wondered who that person was looking back? Have you ever thought about your talents and wondered why they all seemed to focus on something you weren’t really proud of? Have you ever doubted your own humanity? If you answered yes to one or more of those, welcome to being inside my head. I’m going to share a part of my past with you, how my thought process evolved about it and how, today, I consider it one of my greatest strengths. Continue reading

Making and Breaking Habits

According to brainpickings.org, it takes 21 days, at a minimum, to build a new habit. That’s 21 days of repeating the same action, at approximately the same time, and for something simple… like drinking a glass of water when you wake up each day. Another website suggests that it takes over two months – 66 days to be precise – before taking a certain action becomes “automatic”… in other words, a habit. Most other sites reporting on length of time for something to become a habit fall into that variation somewhere: between three weeks (at a BARE minimum for simple actions) to two months for more complex habits; or more difficult ones. Continue reading

The Birthplace of Souls

As happens with most thoughts we consider to be deep or memorable – worthy of remembering – this one came to me in the middle of the night, as the result of a dream I had woken from. In the dream I had been discussing religion with an older gentleman and he had been sharing his insights on the human soul. Given that he was both a priest and a psychologist, I felt it was worth paying attention to.  Part of what you read here is what he shared with me and the remainder is a question, begged I think by long held beliefs without consideration. Continue reading

Sometimes No Decision is “No”

Have you ever asked someone a question and had them answer, “I don’t know,”?  Of course you have, and sometimes that the correct answer.  If you ask them a question regarding a piece of knowledge or information that they don’t possess, then the correct answer for them to give you is, “I don’t know.”  However, if the question is about a piece of personal information such as a preference in where to eat dinner and they answer, “I don’t know,” then it can get a bit frustrating.  What I’ve found to be even worse is when I get no answer at all. Continue reading

The Past’s Impact On Your Future

Have you ever had one of those conversations wherein someone tells you that you shouldn’t have done something?  I used to have such conversations all the time with my dad.  He was the absolute best at reminding me of all the bad decisions I’d made.  He liked to tell me how different my life would be if I’d just made that OTHER choice.  What neither of us ever realized at the time was that the decisions were cumulative.  Each decision made is like a fork in the road: if you choose to take the path on the right, then you get more decisions / forks down that path. If you take the left then the same thing happens.  What most of us imagine is a future where the paths never intersect and actually the end points get farther and farther apart.  But what if the cumulative effect is a juncture of the paths? Continue reading

Who Is To Blame? YOU – And It’s Great!

I know a woman who, at the grand old age of about eight years old, was taught that someone else was to blame.  Blame for what?  Everything. That summer she lived with some relatives and in a very short time span she gained a lot of weight. She had lived the lifestyle of those particular relatives: she ate anything she wanted, did next to no physical activity, watched a LOT of television and gained weight.  She gained about ten pounds in two weeks.  For an eight year old sized person, that’s a lot of weight. When she got home to her family complaining about how fat she was, her mother insisted it wasn’t her fault; it was the fault of the relatives who let her do that. Continue reading

Be A Good Person…

…but don’t waste time to prove it.  What am I talking about?  In today’s world it seems, at least to me as I view the news, social media, etc., that there is a general call to perform random acts of kindness.  Further, it seems as if proof of such action is somehow required – as if you’re not really a good person unless you spend the extra few seconds to document your good works; as if you didn’t actually DO good unless you have evidence of such.  My challenge with that should be obvious:  good deeds are good deeds no matter how many witnesses there are or aren’t and the fact that you’ve done something good requires no more proof or evidence than the result of having done it. Continue reading

Prioritizing Valuable People In Your Day / Life

I will freely confess: One of my biggest pet peeves is when I go out of my way to help someone or do something in an effort to brighten someone’s day… and they sound aggravated that I had the audacity to interrupt whatever it was they were doing or whatever was going on at that moment.  As this just happened to me the other day – I made a phone call to someone whom I thought needed a friendly voice to improve their morning.  They were at work and when they answered the phone the tone of their voice was quite agitated.  I thought that it might have been because they didn’t recognize my voice (yes, I was/am arrogant enough to think they’d be happy to hear from me, especially if I was calling to cheer them up a bit) but even when I was sure they knew who they were talking to, they still sounded like I was an unwelcome and unappreciated interruption to their work day. Continue reading